Holiday and Harvest Reflections

In the last few months, as the holidays flew by, my nights and weekends were filled with ugly sweater parties, gift exchanges, and extra family time. At each event there were lots of laughs, faces I missed, and spreads of delicious food.  It's fun to reflect on the year with loved ones, and my competitive streak always comes out playing cards and ping pong throughout the season. But this...

Permaculture on the Farm: Lessons of Resilience

There is a reason that my kale used to always grow slowly and get its best bits chewed on by aphids or caterpillars. Sure, it was in part because I don’t spray a single chemical on it to enhance its growth rate. I’d rather have holes from caterpillars than poison on my food, so I don’t fog it out to protect it from pests. That being said, these days I firmly believe that there were even...

I Ate Local for a Week and Here’sWhat Happened

I have to start with a confession. Up until very recently, I haven’t thought much about where my food came from. Over the last six years my fiancé and I have taken turns being students, with him finishing up a PhD and me completing a post-graduate diploma. My only thought about the food we ate was if it was relatively nutritious and if it fit into our very tight budget. Now that we’re both...

Bee-ing Better for Pollinators

Pollinators and their habitats are an integral part of agricultural landscapes and, recognizing recent pollinator population declines, producers across the United States are stepping up to create and maintain pollinator habitat on their farmland. These voluntary efforts exemplify the symbiotic relationship of healthy pollinator ecosystems and working lands.  The Xerces Society, with the...

Weather Roulette (the annual weather complaint blog in which your trusty farmer gets a bit Debbie Downer!)

What a spring. From a seemingly early start that morphed into what feels like unending wet gloom, it’s been a wild and muddy April and May this year. The driest day we’ve worked ground so far this season is wetter than the wettest conditions we’ve ever worked land before. Working soil when it’s too wet can lead to problems like poor germination of seeds, a damaged soil structure, or...